3.8 Glossary - Connectors


Have a look at this glossary of different linking words. Are we missing any? If so you can add to the glossary.

Browse the glossary using this index

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A

although

although /ɔːlˈðəʊ/

contrasts two things or ideas, especially when we say that the second thing that happened was surprising in relation to the first thing

  • Although he studied very hard, he did not get very good grades in his exams.

Usage: Used in both formal and informal contexts, but more common in written contexts than spoken ones.


anyway²

anyway² /ˈeniweɪ/

  • emphasises that something that happens is surprising in comparison to another thing

The public transport system here is expensive but many people use it anyway.

Usage: Used in more informal and spoken contexts.


anyway³

anyway³ /ˈeniweɪ/

indicates a return to the main point of a topic

  • Anyway, my point is that traffic will not improve without building more roads.

Usage: Used in more informal and spoken contexts.


anyway¹

anyway¹ /ˈeniweɪ/

introduces an opposite point

  • Some people are against the idea but anyway there are far more people who support it.

Usage: Used in more informal and spoken contexts.


as a result

as a result /əzərəˈzʌlt/

introduces the effect of something

  • More schools are starting to encourage children to eat healthily. As a result, fewer children are eating junk food.

Usage: Used in more formal (especially written) contexts.


as²

as² /əz/

because

  • We were making this journey as we'd read about it in a guide book.

Usage: Used in both formal and informal contexts.


as¹

as¹ /əz/

describes two things happening at the same time

  • As the number of females in higher education rose steadily, there was a sharp drop in the number of males.

Usage: Used in both formal and informal contexts.


B

basically

basically /ˈbeɪsɪkli/

indicates you are going to summarise the main point(s)

  • Basically, there are a lot of problems we need to think about.

Usage: Used in more informal (especially spoken) contexts.


besides

besides /bɪˈsaɪdz/

introduces an extra comment regarding something you have been talking about

  • The exam will be easy so don't worry. Besides, you've done a lot of preparation for it.

Usage: Used in more informal (especially spoken) contexts.


besides this

besides this /bɪˈsaɪdzðɪs/

adds an extra point or idea

  • Many people do not have sufficient time to do exercise. Besides this, there are often a lack of sports facilities in many areas.

Usage: Used in more formal contexts.


D

despite

despite /dɪˈspaɪt/

 

emphasises that something is true and in comparison to another thing this is surprising.

  • Despite having many beautiful beaches, there is very little tourism in the region.

Usage: Usually used in more formal contexts, e.g. essays.


due to

due to /djuːtə/

explains the reason for something happening

  • The flight was delayed due to a technical problem with the plane.

Usage: Used in more formal contexts. The synonym because is more likely in less formal contexts


F

furthermore

furthermore /fɜːðəˈmɔː/

introduces an additional point

  • Many teachers and doctors are underpaid. Furthermore, they work extremely long hours doing difficult jobs.

Usage: Used in more formal (especially written) contexts.


H

hence

hence /hens/

states that one thing is the result of another thing

  • Hence, the more competition there is, the more benefits are given to both people and society.

Usage: Used in more formal (especially academic) contexts.


however

however /həʊˈevə/

emphasises that something that happened was a surprise in comparison to another thing

  • Some people say that computer games are bad for children's development, however many of them are actually educational.

Usage: Used in both formal and informal contexts but is more likely in formal contexts. The synonym but is often used in more informal contexts.


I

I mean

I mean /aiˈmiːn/

indicates you are going to explain something you have said more clearly or in more detail

  • Many young people don't like politics - I mean most just find it boring.

Usage: Used mostly in informal spoken contexts.


in terms of

in terms of /ɪnˈtɜːmzəv/

describes a particular aspect of something that you are talking about

  • My university course is great in terms of the practical subjects, but the theory is a little complicated.

Usage: Can be used in both formal and informal contexts.


indeed²

indeed² /ɪnˈdiːd/

adds emphasis

  • Smoking is very bad for you indeed.

Usage: Used in both formal and informal contexts.


indeed³

indeed³ /ɪnˈdiːd/

develops an argument further by adding supporting points

  • A lot of people cannot afford to send their children to private schools. Indeed, a recent report found only 3% of parents were able to.

Usage: Used in more formal (especially academic) contexts.


indeed¹

indeed¹ /ɪnˈdiːd/

emphasises that you think something is true

  • Letting children play video games is indeed bad for their development.

Usage: Used in both formal and informal contexts.


M

moreover

moreover /mɔːrˈəʊvə/

introduces an additional idea which is even more important or relevant than a previous one

  • The restaurant has a nice atmosphere and, moreover, the food is fantastic.

Usage: Usually used in formal contexts.


O

on the other hand

on the other hand /ɒnðəˈʌðəhænd/

compares two different points of view or ideas

  • Some argue that zoos are cruel to animals and should be banned. On the other hand, some feel they provide comfortable environments for many animals and offer us fantastic educational opportunities.

Usage: Usually used in academic contexts.


owing to

owing to /ˈəʊɪŋtə/

describes the reason for something happening

  • The environmental problems we face now are owing to governments not doing enough to tackle pollution.

Usage: Used in more formal and academic contexts.


T

therefore

therefore /ðeəˈfɔː/

introduces the result of something

  • Many young children spend all day time playing computer games and are, therefore, less likely to play outside.

Usage: Used in more formal contexts. In more informal contexts it is likely the synonym so would be used.


though

though /ðəu/

says that something is surprising or is an exception in relation to another thing

  • I haven't really got any experience in sales. My degree is in business studies though so I know a bit about it.

Usage: used in more informal (especially spoken) contexts.


W

while²

while² /waɪl/

introduces an idea that is surprising compared to another that has just been mentioned

  • While there have always been differences in the types of work men and women have done, the trend in modern times is for both sexes to have greater freedom of choice in terms of employment.

Usage: More common in formal contexts. In less formal contexts (especially spoken ones) the synonym but is often used instead. While and whilst have exactly the same meanings.


while¹

while¹ /waɪl/

says that something happened at the same time as another thing

  • While I was at school, the government made a lot of changes to the education system.

Usage: Used in both formal and informal contexts. While and whilst have exactly the same meanings.



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